Today in the city Los Lunas 27.06.2019

3 people have died in national parks since the government shutdown began, according to report

Three people have died in national parks since the US government shutdown began, according to a new report from The Washington Post.
The partial shutdown went into effect after midnight on December 22 — after the White House and Congress failed to reach an agreement over a stopgap bill to fund the government and $5 billion in funding for President Donald Trump's desired wall along the US-Mexico border.
Roughly 16,000 of 19,000 National Park Service employees are furloughed, and the parks are being manned by a skeleton staff, The Post reports.
In a statement to The Washington Post, Jeremy Barnum, a spokesperson for the National Park Service, said that on average six people die in the parks per week due to "accidents like drownings, falls, and motor vehicle crashes and medical related incidents such as heart attacks."

Three people have died in national parks since the government shutdown began, according to a new report from The Washington Post.
The partial government shutdown began after midnight on December 22 — after the White House and Congress failed to reach an agreement over a stopgap bill to fund the government and $5 billion in funding for President Donald Trump's desired wall along the US-Mexico border.
The partial shutdown impacts nine federal agencies (the rest of the government has been funded) and around 800,000 federal government employees; 420,000 of those employees are considered "essential" and must continue working without pay, while the rest have been furloughed.
Unlike longer government shutdowns under Presidents Obama and Clinton, the Trump administration opted to keep national parks open to visitors. The Trump administration also kept them open during the shutdown of January 2018, which only lasted only several days.
Roughly 16,000 of 19,000 National Park Service employees are furloughed, and the parks are being manned by a skeleton staff, The Post reports.
The first death occurred on December 24 at Horseshoe Bend in Arizona. Authorities believe a 14-year-old girl from San Jose, California fell roughly 700 feet to her death, according to NBC Los Angeles.
The next day, December 25, a man fell and suffered a head injury in Yosemite National Park; he later died from his injuries, according to The Fresno Bee.
"We aren’t releasing more detail because the incident remains under investigation, which is taking longer than usual because of the shutdown," Andrew Muñoz, acting chief of public and congressional affairs for the National Park Service’s Pacific West Region, told the Bee in an emailed statement. "A news release wasn’t issued because of the shutdown."
On December 27, at Tennessee’s Great Smoky Mountain National Park, a tree fell and killed pediatrician, and mother of three Laila Jiwani, 42, who was reportedly shielding her son, who sustained injuries, from the collapsing tree.
Business Insider contacted the Department of the Interior, the National Park Service, the White House, and congressional leaders for more information.
In a statement to The Washington Post, Jeremy Barnum, a spokesperson for the National Park Service, said that on average six people die in the parks per week due to "accidents like drownings, falls, and motor vehicle crashes and medical related incidents such as heart attacks."
"Visitors can reduce their risk of injury if they plan ahead and prepare properly, select the most appropriate activity that matches their skill set and experience, seek information before they arrive at the park about hazards and environmental conditions, follow rules and regulations and use sound judgement while recreating," Barnum told The Post.
Still, others told The Post that the shutdown increases risk for visitors. Sanitation could be an issue, Diane Regas, president and CEO of The Trust for Public Land, told The Post. Parks currently have varying degrees of cleanup staff. Some parks are filling with trash, while volunteers are cleaning and stocking bathrooms at parks like Joshua Tree in California.
The shutdown could also pose a safety risk, in terms of how quickly authorities can get to visitors in case of an emergency, Daniel Wenk, former superintendent of Yellowstone National Park, said to The Post. Overall, there is the risk of having fewer people to guide visitors in their experience.
Parks have stayed open during shorter shutdowns. However, as the shutdown hits the two week mark, some parks are hoping they'll be able to close, The Post reports.
One national park that is open and staffed? The Old Post Office Pavilion Clock Tower located in the Trump International Hotel in Washington, DC. A spokesperson for the General Service Administration, which leases the building to the Trump Organization told the Associated Press in a statement that a law requires it to remain open and said it's status was "unrelated to the facility's tenant."Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Anthony Scaramucci claims Trump isn't a nationalist: 'He likes saying that because it irks these intellectual elitists'

the source: https://www.businessinsider.com/3-have-died-in-national-parks-since-government-shutdown-began-report-2019-1

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